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Places of Worship

There are two main mosques in the Putrajaya city, namely Putra Mosque and Tuanku Mizan Zainal Abidin Mosque.

Putra Mosque

Surrounded by Putrajaya Lake and facing Putra Square, Putra Mosque with its magnificent pink domes is one of Putrajaya’s popular landmarks. Named after Malaysia’s first Prime Minister, Tunku Abdul Rahman Putra Al Haj, Putra Mosque is constructed with rose-tinted granite and inspired by some of the world’s most famous mosque.

Putra Mosque

Putra Mosque’s main entrance adopts a design similar to Muslim Persia’s public building gates and consists of five tiers which represent the Five Pillars of Islam. Standing at 116m in height, the minaret of the Putra Mosque is the highest in the region and designed after Baghdad’s Sheikh Omar Mosque.

Putra Mosque

The highest point below the dome is 250 feet above ground level and its basement wall of the mosque resembles that of the King Hassan Mosque in Casablanca, Morocco.

Putra Mosque

Putra Mosque consists of three main areas; a 12-column main prayer hall, a landscaped courtyard named The Sahn, and an area housing a religious learning centre and function rooms. The mosque can accommodate 15,000 worshipers at a time. Visitors should be dressed appropriately.

Putra Mosque

 

Putra Mosque
Jabatan Kemajuan Islam Malaysia (JAKIM),
Pusat Pentadbiran Kerajaan Persekutuan,
62502 Putrajaya, Malaysia.
Tel: 603-8888 5678
Fax: 603-8888 3166
Website: www.masjidputra.gov.my
GPS: 2.936055, 101.689578


 Tuanku Mizan Zainal Abidin Mosque

Named after the 13th Yang di-Pertuan Agong, Al-Wathiqu Billah Tuanku Mizan Zainal Abidin Ibni Al-Marhum Sultan Mahmud Al-Muktafi Billah Shah, Tuanku Mizan Zainal Abidin Mosque employs “architectural wire mesh” and fine glass to create the illusion of a silvery white metallic structure and characterises three design principles, namely simplicity, airiness and transparency.

 Tuanku Mizan Zainal Abidin Mosque

The mosque was built out of 6,000 tonnes of reinforced stainless steel which makes up 70% of its structure, earning it the moniker, Steel Mosque. Employing a ‘light, airy and transparent’ design concept, the mosque relies on natural ventilation and an air-cooling technology called ‘Gas District Cooling’ to ensure that the air within the building stays cool even without the use of fans or air conditioners.

Tuanku Mizan Zainal Abidin Mosque

Lattice screens made from stainless steel surround its main prayer hall in place of walls, allowing free flow of air. Thirteen-metre glass panels imported from Germany, on which verses from the Holy Qur’an are engraved, adorn its interior, giving the impression of ‘floating verses’.

Tuanku Mizan Zainal Abidin Mosque

Tuanku Mizan Zainal Abidin Mosque adopts a combination of Chinese and German architectural styles. And unlike most mosques, it doesn’t come with a minaret.

Tuanku Mizan Zainal Abidin Mosque

A walkway named Qiblat Walk connects the mosque to the nearby Putrajaya Corporation Complex. The mosque able to fit up to 20,000 worshipers at a time.

 Tuanku Mizan Zainal Abidin Mosque

Qiblat Walk is designed and formed as a showpiece of visual linkage in the direction pointing towards mecca as the qiblat for Moslems, as well as a pedestrian path linkage between the Palace of Justice and the Tuanku Mizan Zainal Abidin Mosque.

 Tuanku Mizan Zainal Abidin Mosque

Tuanku Mizan Zainal Abidin Mosque
No.25, Jalan Tunku Abdul Rahman,
Precinct 3, Pusat Pentadbiran Kerajaan Persekutuan, 62100 Putrajaya.
Tel: 603-8880 4300
Fax: 603-8890 1614
Email: admin@masjidtuankumizan.gov.my
Website: www.masjidtuankumizan.gov.my


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